The-McAlpin

Art Deco District Miami – A perfect place to explore

Art Deco District Miami – A perfect place to explore

Art Deco District Miami is a perfect place for those who want to see the colorful, iconic structures. Let’s follow our post to know more!

Art-Deco-District-Miami
Art-Deco-District-Miami

Overview

Miami’s Art Deco architecture is stunning. The city has the highest concentration of Art Deco structures in the world and the South Beach skyline was prevented from turning into a canyon of condos.

In Miami Beach’s Art Deco Historic District, which has the country’s highest concentration of the sleek and colorful architectural style, the designs of the 1920s and 1930s are still very much alive. There are about 800 classified historic buildings in the neighborhood, which has been recognized as a national historic district since 1979. However, some of these structures showcase other contemporary architectural forms from various periods in Miami’s history.

What is Art Deco?

Art deco is defined by strong geometrical designs, bright pastel colors, and streamlined, fluid forms. The movement, which is also referred to as “Cubism Tamed,” was founded in France in the 1920s and experienced an enormous rise in popularity in the United States in the 1920s and 1930s. You may already be familiar with the Chrysler Building and Empire State Building in New York City as examples of well-known art deco structures.

Where is the Art Deco District?

The Art Deco District Miami is located in Miami Beach between 5th Street and 23rd Street, along Ocean Drive, Collins Avenue and Washington Avenue.

The Eight Most Famous Art Deco Structures in Miami

1.The Carlyle

There’s no denying that the Carlyle is one of Miami’s most iconic structures, despite the fact that its clean white facade may appear more subdued than other structures on this list. 

The Carlyle, which was designed by German American architect Richard Kiehnel, has appeared in movies like Scarface (1983), The Birdcage (1996), and Random Hearts (1999).

The-Carlyle
The-Carlyle

2. The McAlpin

The McAlpin is regarded as an almost ideal example of Miami art deco. The McAlpin’s boxy form sticks out from its neighbors on Ocean Drive because of its delightfully symmetrical design and details in turquoise and coral pink. The McAlpin was designed by Dixon in 1940 was one of the city’s most well-liked selfie locations today and is a 52-room Hilton hotel.

The-McAlpin
The-McAlpin

3. Miami Beach Post Office

The Miami Beach post office on Washington Avenue was built in 1937 and was the brainchild of Chicago-based architect Howard Lovewell Cheney. It was constructed during the Great Depression under the auspices of the Works Progress Administration. The peculiar post office has a circular lobby, a glass block wall 10 feet high above the entrance, and a giant stone eagle over the doorway. The ceiling of the lobby is formed like a cone and is crowned with a miniature cupola. 

 Miami-Beach-Post-Office
Miami-Beach-Post-Office

4. The Colony Hotel

The Colony Hotel was designed in 1935 by Henry Hohauser, one of Miami’s most prolific architects who is thought to have designed 300 structures nearby. The building was the first “streamline moderne” structure in Miami, and turquoise paint was used to emphasize its three tiers. However, the inverted T-shaped sign bearing the hotel’s name and glowing a melancholy blue at night may be the structure’s most recognizable feature.

Each of the 50 rooms in the hotel had its own bathroom, and other top-of-the-line (for the time) facilities included a radio and telephone in every room. The building was constructed to serve as a luxurious retreat for upper middle-class guests.

The-Colony-Hotel
The-Colony-Hotel

5. Park Central Hotel

The Park Central Hotel, which first opened its doors in 1937, is a Miami landmark and is occasionally referred to as the “Blue Jewel of Miami” because of its blue paint highlights and neon lighting. During its prime, the hotel, another Hohauser masterpiece, was a favorite of stars like Clark Gable and Rita Hayworth. The Blue Jewel is a seven-story building with 135 rooms that are decorated in Old Florida style. It also has a sculpture garden, rooftop terrace, a small pool, and elegant terrazzo flooring throughout.

Park-Central-Hotel
Park-Central-Hotel

6. The Webster

The Webster, which was completed in 1939, is a superb illustration of Hohauser’s commitment to the principle of threes because it is proportionally divided into thirds both horizontally and vertically and has a trio of windows on each of its three storeys. Despite being built with the intention of being a hotel, the Webster presently serves as the flagship location for a posh clothes business. Terrazzo flooring, pastel interior design, and beamed ceilings in a contemporary warehouse style are all features that visitors will notice inside.

The-Webster
The-Webster

7. Hoffman’s Cafeteria Building

On this list, The Bass is arguably the most understated but also one of the most beautiful examples of art deco. The building was the very first venue for a public art exhibition in South Florida when it was initially built in 1930 to house the Miami Beach Public Library and Arts Center. It was created by architect Russell Pancoast, a local early property developer and the grandson of John Collins. 

The walls of the structure, which are made of oolitic limestone and preserved Paleolithic coral, are possibly its most fascinating feature. The walls are further embellished with bas reliefs carved by artist Gustav Boland, some of the highlights of which include a pelican devouring a fish and a representation of the Spanish conquest. The building was renamed the Bass Museum in 1964.

Hoffman’s-Cafeteria-Building
Hoffman’s-Cafeteria-Building

8. The Bass Museum

On this list, The Bass is arguably the most understated but also one of the most beautiful examples of art deco. The building was the very first venue for a public art exhibition in South Florida when it was initially built in 1930 to house the Miami Beach Public Library and Arts Center. It was created by architect Russell Pancoast, a local early property developer and the grandson of John Collins. 

The walls of the structure, which are made of oolitic limestone and preserved Paleolithic coral, are possibly its most fascinating feature. The walls are further embellished with bas reliefs carved by artist Gustav Boland, some of the highlights of which include a pelican devouring a fish and a representation of the Spanish conquest. The building was renamed the Bass Museum in 1964.

The-Bass-Museum
The-Bass-Museum

Things to do in the Miami Art Deco District

  • Get Your Shopping Fix In on Lincoln Road
  • Walk the Pier at South Pointe Park
  • Take a Sightseeing Tour
  • Soak in the Sun on South Beach
  • Stay or Eat at the Former Versace Mansion
  • Stay or Eat at the Former Versace Mansion
  • Dine at the Iconic Joe’s Stone Crab
  • Explore the Latest Contemporary Art at the Bass Museum
  • Dance the Night Away at Story Nightclub

(25) 4K 60p Miami Beach – Lincoln Road Mall, Walking Tour (2019) – YouTube

(25) 🇺🇸 JOE’S STONE CRAB – Miami – YouTube

Some closest hotels to Art Deco District Miami

  • The Penquin Hotel
  • The Petsy-South Beach
  • Beacon Hotel South Beach
  • Bentley Hotel South Beach
  • South Beach Plaza Hotel
  • Starlite Hotel
  • The Tony Hotel South Beach
  • Dream South Beach

Conclusion

Have you ever visited Art Deco District Miami? What do you think of it? Please comment below to share with Artseensoho.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the name of the architecture in Miami?

Miami and Art Deco are synonymous. This particular architectural style is very well-known in the city, particularly at South Beach where it predominates.

How safe is Miami for travel?

In general, Miami is a safe city, especially for visitors. There are some risky spots there that you should stay away from, but they are not near the typical tourist attractions. Pickpockets are a problem in tourist areas, so it’s a good idea to be on the lookout for suspicious activity there as well as anywhere else.

Does Miami have Art Deco buildings?

Miami’s Art Deco architecture is stunning. The quantity of Art Deco structures in the city is the most in the world.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.